Children’s Vision

Children's VisionVision problems affect 1 in 20 preschoolers and 1 in 4 school-age children. Left untreated, the problems can worsen and lead to other serious problems as well as affect learning ability, personality and adjustment in school. The best way to protect children's vision is through professional eye examinations, beginning shortly after birth, at 6 months of age, at two to three years old, before entering school (age five or six), and periodically throughout the school years.

Unfortunately only 14 percent of children receive a comprehensive vision exam before entering school. Consider these facts:

  • Vision disorders are the fourth most common disability in the United States and the most prevalent handicapping condition during childhood.
  • A recent study found that one in seven kindergarten age children in Kentucky had an undiagnosed vision problem that could interfere with learning.
  • Many children do receive an "eye chart" test or "vision screening," but according to research published by the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO), nearly 10 percent of children that pass the test actually have a vision problem that needs correction.
  • Even children that fail a simple "vision screening" are at risk. According to the AAO, between 40 and 67 percent of children that fail the test do not receive the recommended follow-up care. According to the Journal of School Health, when a five to six year old fails an initial vision screening, the average delay before evaluation by an eye care professional is 4.1 years.

Does Your Child Need an Eye Exam?

Consider these alarming facts:

  • Vision disorders are the 4th most common disability in the United States.
  • A recent study found that 1 in 7 kindergarten age children may have an undiagnosed vision problem that could interfere with learning.
  • Many children do receive an "eye chart" test or "vision screening", but according to research published by the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO), nearly 10% of children that pass this test actually have a vision problem that correction.
  • Even children that fail a simple "vision screening" are at risk. According to AAO, between 40-67 percent of children that fail do not receive the recommended follow-up care.
  • Each year 75,000 3-year olds develop amblyopia (lazy eye) in the US. Amblyopia is the leading cause of vision loss between the ages of 20-70 years and is preventable and treatable with early detection!

Vision problems affect 1 in 20 pre-schoolers and 1 in 4 school-age children. Left untreated, the problems can worsen and lead to other serious problems as well as affect learning ability, personality and adjustment in school. The best way to protect a child's eyes is through professional eye examinations, beginning shortly after birth, at 6 months of age, at 2-3 years old, before entering school (age 5 or 6), and periodically throughout the school years.

Unfortunately only 14 percent of children receive a comprehensive vision exam before entering school - WHAT A SHAME.

Children's Vision Links

View the following links for more information about children's vision health: